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Making Sure your Child’s Teeth Develop Correctly

Making Sure your Child’s Teeth Develop Correctly

As a parent, your child’s well being is one of your top concerns. Of course, it is! You want your little one to grow up strong, healthy, and happy. One of the best ways to do that is to take care of their teeth. When you give your little one the care, attention, and skills needed for their teeth to develop correctly, you set them up for straight teeth and a healthy mouth well into their lives. 

Like you, we care about setting your little one’s mouth up for success. Here are a few of our top recommendations for doing just that:

How to Keep Your Child’s Teeth Healthy

Healthy teeth are one of the essential pieces of your child’s overall health. In addition to cutting down on the risk of chronic diseases and bacterial infections, a healthy mouth inspires confidence and promotes normal development. Here are a few ways to keep your child’s teeth healthy from the get-go:

  • Avoid leaving bottles in a baby’s crib, and given children fruit juices and sweet drinks sparingly
  • Before your baby’s teeth erupt, rub the gums with your finger or a wet cloth after the baby eats or drinks. This will keep the gums clean and keep oral bacteria to a minimum. 
  • Take your baby to a pediatric dentist by this first birthday, or as soon as they cut their first tooth
  • As soon as your little one’s first tooth erupts, start brushing the tooth and teaching the child healthy brushing habits
  • Demonstrate healthy oral habits and routines in your daily life – lead by example as parents
  • Limit sweet food, sticky food, and food that’s high in sugar. Offer healthy food options for your child and limit unhealthy choices
  • Give your child plenty of books and education to help them learn about good oral health

Behaviors to Avoid for a Healthy Mouth

Knowledge and great habits are essential for good dental health. While other things, like genetics, also play a role, one of the biggest definers of your child’s dental health is behavior. Specific behavioral considerations can damage dental health and put your child at risk of future dental issues. With that in mind, be aware of the following behaviors in your child:

Pacifier Sucking

Pacifiers are often considered a lifesaver by parents. Used to calm a fussy baby, soothe a child who wants to suckle, or put a little one to sleep, pacifiers are a popular accessory for young kids. Despite that, however, the use of pacifiers is much-debated in the parenting world. 

According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, pacifier use is fine for kids, as long as it’s implemented correctly. When used excessively or for too long, pacifiers can damage a child’s dental development. If a child is still using a pacifier as his or her teeth begin to break through the surface, for example, the pacifier and the pressure of the suckling motion can press teeth out of position and cause a misalignment in the mouth.

Thumb Sucking

Thumb sucking, pacifier sucking, can develop into a damaging habit if it goes on too long. While kids typically chew and suck on their fingers as they are teething, children who continue thumb-sucking behavior for too long risk misaligning their teeth and becoming dependent on the action. 

Because of this, dentists recommend discontinuing thumb sucking by the time the child reaches the age of two. If the behavior persists past this point, teeth may come in crooked, or they may protrude from the front of the mouth. 

Dental Problems Kids May Face

With or without potentially-damaging behavior, kids may face the following dental issues:

  • Overcrowding. This is a common issue in both kids and adults alike. If your child has a small jaw, there might not be enough space for your baby’s adult teeth to come through. This can cause other teeth to move or shift to make room for adult teeth. Poor hygiene from overcrowding is another issue. Overcrowding can make it challenging to maintain a healthy mouth since it’s hard to clean all teeth adequately when they’re too close together.
  • Dental Misalignment. Things like crossbites and overbites can cause teeth to come in crooked, leading to bite issues down the road. 
  • Airway Restriction. In some extreme cases, kids can even experience airway and breathing issues thanks to dental problems. Mouth breathing, for example, can be caused by jaws that are too narrow or deep. 
  • Crooked Teeth. Crooked teeth can lead to bite issues and confidence issues for kids. Adolescence is already hard enough for little ones, without struggling with these things.  

How to Set Your Child up for Dental Success

The best thing you can do to ensure your children’s teeth develop correctly is to be attentive. The more attention you pay to your child’s dental development, the more likely it is that you’ll be able to spot potential dental issues and stop them before they become significant issues. 

By brushing your child’s teeth, setting a good dental hygiene example, and taking your child to the dentist regularly, you can avoid most common dental issues. According to The American Association of Orthodontists, you should take your child for his or her first orthodontic check-up before he or she reaches the age of seven. 

If you don’t have a family orthodontist, as your dentist for a recommendation. They likely have a professional in town they enjoy working with. The orthodontist will be able to evaluate your child’s jaw and tooth development and decide whether or not any intervention is required. 

This orthodontic care, when combined with your child’s traditional dental care, will go a long way toward setting your child up for dental success and ensuring a lifetime of healthy teeth and mouths. Additionally, getting your child into the dentist early helps prevent dental phobias and ensure that your child will continue taking care of his or her teeth, long after you stop being in charge of it. 

 

Ready to learn more or book your child’s first appointment? Contact our team today. 

Dry Mouth? 5 Things You Need to Do!

Dry Mouth? 5 Things You Need to Do!

Dry mouth can not only cause discomfort it can lead to other issues in your mouth such as cavities, infections, and other issues. If you are experiencing prolonged dry mouth it is important to speak with your dentist to find the underlying cause so it can be treated properly. There are some great ways to help alleviate your symptoms and help you heal your dry mouth.

Dry mouth does not have to cause you issues or pain, generally, it is easily treatable as long as it is not caused by an underlying disease. Be sure to talk to your dentist about any symptoms you are having and what does and does not help!

Do I Need A Night Guard?

Do I Need A Night Guard?

Are you waking up with a sore jaw or a headache? Does your partner wake you up complaining that you’ve been grinding your teeth? Do your chompers hurt after a night of rest? If so, you’re probably experiencing bruxism – a condition that’s not only painful but can be damaging to teeth. Bruxism, also known as teeth grinding, is prevalent. In fact, about 10-15% of American adults do it, according to the American Dental Association (ADA).

While Bruxism is common, it’s also easy to treat. In fact, there are dozens of ways to address and minimize the impacts of bruxism. One of the most common, though, is adding a night guard to your nighttime routine.

Here’s what you need to know about this option, and whether it’s a good fit for you.

What is a Night Guard?

What is a Night Guard

A night guard is exactly what it sounds like: a guard you put into your mouth at night to protect your teeth from nocturnal grinding. 

According to the American Sleep Association (ASA):

“Most cases of bruxism can easily be treated by wearing a night guard while you sleep. Night guards are also known as dental guards, mouth guards, nocturnal bite plates, or bite splints. They work by putting a barrier between your teeth. When you clench your jaw, the night guard helps to lighten the tension and give cushion to the muscles in the jaw. This cushioning not only helps to prevent face and jaw pain but also protects the enamel of your teeth. They look very similar to snoring remedies.”

If you want to acquire a night guard, you can either buy one over-the-counter or speak directly to your dentist. Generally, the latter option is the smarter one. Since everyone’s mouth is different, mouth guards are most effective when they’re fitted specifically to your dental arch and teeth. While your dentist can afford this level of customization, it’ll be impossible coming from an OTC guard. 

Different Types of Night Guards

Different Types of Night Guards

If you’re interested in a night guard, you should also know that there are a few different kinds of night guards. These include the following:

Soft Night Guards

Soft night guards are the most common type of guard, and, according to many, the most effective. They’re generally used for people who grind their teeth occasionally or mildly and are not a good fit for severe teeth grinders.

  • These night guards are the most comfortable, and fit into the mouth naturally
  • They’re the easiest to get used to
  • They’re also the most affordable
  • They do not have the same lifespan of laminate guards and are not a long-term solution for bruxism 

Dual Laminate Night Guards

Dual laminate night guards are well-suited to severe nighttime grinders. These quads feature a soft material on the inside and hard plastic on the outside of the guard.

  • They are durable enough to stand up to heavy grinding
  • They last longer than soft guards
  • They offer more extended warranties than soft guards
  • They are thicker than other types of guards and can be harder to get used to

Hard Night Guards

These night guards are made from an acrylic material. As the name would suggest, they are extremely rigid, but also very durable. These are only suited to the most severe nighttime grinders. 

  • These guards prevent teeth from shifting
  • They offer the longest warranty of any guard
  • They are much thicker than any other type of guard, and the most difficult to get used to using
  • They must be ordered from a dentist, as dental impressions are required
  • They are the most expensive type of night guard

Finding Your Perfect Fit Mouth Guard

Again, there are several ways to choose a mouth guard, and the option you pursue depends, in large part, on your preferences, budget, and needs. Here are a few of the most popular options:

  • “One-size-fits-all.” When you go to a pharmacy to buy a mouthguard, they’re designed to be “One size fits all.” These mouth guards are not custom-fitted, but they will work for mild to occasional teeth-grinders and are the most affordable option.
  •  “Boil and bite.” This type of mouthguard is slightly more customized, but not by much. To fit it, you toss it in some boiling water, pull it out, let it cool slightly, and bite into it to leave the impression of your teeth and dental arch. This is a common approach. These guards are affordable and popular.
  • Direct-to-consumer guards. Today, lots of companies manufacture night guards and send them directly to consumers. These companies send an impression to customers first, the customers complete it and send it back, and then the company builds the custom night guard. 
  • Custom guards. If you need a custom or a very durable solution, you’ll go right to your dentist for your night guard needs. The dentist will fit you for a guard and help you ensure you’ve got the solution you need. 

Other Treatments for Bruxism

Want to try a few other things before you go straight to a night guard? Here are a few different treatment options for Bruxism:

  • Having your teeth straightened. If your teeth are out of alignment, it makes teeth grinding worse. Fortunately, you can resolve much of this with simple corrective measures like braces or aligners. 
  • Stress prevention. One of the leading causes of teeth grinding is anxiety or nervousness, so resolving these issues can go a long way toward alleviating the problem. Talk to your doctor about stress prevention methods, and look into counseling if you feel you need additional support. 
  • Diet and medication changes. In some cases, resolving bruxism requires treating the condition from within. Talk to your dentist and doctor about changing your diet or adding medication if your bruxism is severe or persistent. 

If you’ve been suffering from bruxism – there’s still hope. You can find relief – it’s just a matter of deciding which treatment is right for you. Night guards are an excellent choice, so be sure to talk to your dentist about this option next time you visit. 

 

Ready to learn more? Contact our team today. 

 

The Best Toothpastes For Your Family

The Best Toothpastes For Your Family

We all have different needs when it comes to our oral health, finding the right toothpaste for everyone in your family can be hard to do. Each person has different needs about what they need their toothpaste to do. We are here to help you break down the best types for each member of your family.

The best toothpastes for your family

Everyone has different needs and it is important to address those needs to help everyone’s oral health flourish. If you have any questions about types, brands, etc. we would be happy to answer those at your next appointment.

10 Bad Foods for Your Teeth

10 Bad Foods for Your Teeth

“You are what you eat.” As it turns out, that adage may be especially true when it comes to your teeth. The front lines of defense when it comes to acids, colors, dyes, and bacteria in our food, our teeth work especially hard during mealtime. Because of this, it makes sense that certain foods would be good for your teeth, while others would put them at risk of decay, discoloration, and damage.

Here’s what you need to know about the top foods that are bad for your teeth, and a few you can sub out instead. 

10 Foods That Are Terrible for Your Teeth

Did you know that cavities are the single most common chronic disease in people ages 6-19 years old? Don’t worry, though. You can prevent or decrease cavities by taking good care of your teeth, brushing often, and limiting or avoiding these ten foods and drinks:

1. Soda

Most people know that pop isn’t great for our teeth. What lots of us don’t know, however, is exactly how damaging it can be. According to one recent study, drinking large quantities of soda may be as detrimental to human teeth as using crack cocaine or methamphetamine. 

Let that sink in for a moment.

So, why are sodas so damaging? The answer is acid. Carbonated sodas create a chemical reaction in your mouth, which allows the plaque on your teeth to create more acid. The acid then goes to work on your dental enamel, leading to rapid decay and discoloration. Finally, sodas can stain teeth and cause dry mouth – both of which wreak dental health havoc. 

2. Dried Fruit

Dried fruit is a healthy snack, right? Right! Unfortunately, it does a number on your teeth. Dried fruits like apricots and raisins, for example, have a sticky residue which can coat your teeth and get stuck in the gaps between the tooth and the gum. 

Over time, the sugars in the coating interact with the plaque in your mouth, creating an ideal environment for decay. If you’re going to snack on dried fruit, be sure to brush and floss your teeth afterward. 

3. Potato Chips

Potato chips are delicious, but they’re a prime source of starch. When you crunch on this salty snack, the starch transforms to sugar in your mouth. When that sugar becomes trapped between your teeth, it feeds bacteria and plaque and promotes acid production and decay. If you can’t avoid potato chips altogether, brush and floss as soon as you’ve finished your snack 

4. Citrus Fruits

Oranges, lemons, limes, oh my! Citrus fruits pack a welcome punch, but their acid content is tough on teeth, eating away at enamel and weakening a tooth’s natural defenses. If you want to take advantage of the health benefits of citrus without harming your chompers, keep your citrus intake moderate and swish your mouth with water after you’re done eating. 

5. Candy

Candy is a bit like soda when it comes to our teeth. Most people know it’s not health food. As it turns out, though, some candies are worse than others when it comes to our teeth. 

Sour and hard candidates, for example, stick to teeth and dissolve slowly in the mouth, respectively. This jacks up acid content and creates a residue that’s tough to brush away. Swap these sweet treats for a square of dark chocolate, instead. Chocolate won’t coat teeth and is easier to brush away. 

6. Bread

Even nice, healthy, homemade wheat bread contains starch, and when you eat starch, your mouth breaks it down into sugar. This sugar becomes a sticky, gummy paste that lodges into the crevices of teeth and promotee decay. 

While you can cut down on this effect by opting for more wholesome, whole-wheat varieties, it’s smart to brush your teeth after enjoying that lunchtime sandwich. 

7. Alcohol

Alcohol does something interesting to the mouth: it cuts saliva production and creates dry mouth. Unfortunately, saliva keeps teeth healthy, and dry mouths are more susceptible to damage, decay, and dental staining. Additionally, saliva helps reduce the likelihood of oral infections and keep teeth healthy. With this in mind, keep alcohol intake to a minimum and drink plenty of water.

8. Ice

Ice seems harmless, but it can break and fracture teeth if you decide to chew it. Even if ice doesn’t break teeth, it can crack enamel and loosen crowns, leading to expensive dental bills and more. Because of this, it’s critical to avoid chewing ice and other hard objects.  

9. Fruit Juice

Fruit juice is billed as a healthy snack, but it contains lots of natural sugars. In fact, some fruit juice contains the same amount of sugar as drinks like Coke or Pepsi. With this in mind, keep your fruit juice consumption minimal, and rinse your mouth with water afterward.

10. Fried Food

Fried food is dense in calories, but it also contains chemical compounds like acrylamide, oxysterols, acrolein, heterocyclic amines, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and more. These compounds boost your risk of cancer and heart disease, while also lodging in your teeth and creating a perfect environment for decay. As a general rule, it’s a good idea to limit your consumption of fried food, and always to brush your teeth after you enjoy a cheat meal. 

Keeping Your Mouth Healthy

Your mouth works hard when it comes to mealtime. In addition to breaking down food, making it easier to process nutrients, and creating an enjoyable experience, your mouth also takes the brunt of the acids, bacteria, and textures contained in our foods. 

This year, do your mouth a solid by being mindful of what you’re putting on your plate. Swapping out food that is tough on your teeth for foods that are easier to chew and eat will go a long way toward protecting your dental health and reducing emergency dental visits.

 

Are you overdue for your yearly cleaning or exam? Contact our offices today to book your first appointment with our team of friendly, knowledgeable dentists.